Saturday, 6 August 2011

NASA - JUNO Jupiter Launch





get my countdown

Mission
Juno will…
  • Determine how much water is in Jupiter’s atmosphere, which helps determine which planet formation theory is correct (or if new theories are needed)
  • Look deep into Jupiter’s atmosphere to measure composition, temperature, cloud motions and other properties
  • Map Jupiter’s magnetic and gravity fields, revealing the planet’s deep structure
  • Explore and study Jupiter’s magnetosphere near the planet’s poles, especially the auroras – Jupiter’s northern and southern lights – providing new insights about how the planet’s enormous magnetic force field affects its atmosphere.
Mission Timeline


  • Launch - August 2011
  • Earth flyby gravity assist - October 2013
  • Jupiter arrival - July 2016
  • End of mission (deorbit) - October 2017

Juno's scientific payload includes:


  • A gravity/radio science system
  • A six-wavelength microwave radiometer for atmospheric sounding and composition
  • A vector magnetometer
  • Plasma and energetic particle detectors
  • A radio/plasma wave experiment
  • An ultraviolet imager/spectrometer
  • An infrared imager/spectrometer

Tit-bits


  • Five-year cruise to Jupiter, arriving July 2016
  • Spacecraft will orbit Jupiter for about one year (33 orbits)
  • Mission ends with de-orbit into Jupiter
  • Juno will improve our understanding of our solar system’s beginnings by revealing the origin and evolution of Jupiter.



About the lego picture:

Juno holds a magnifying glass to signify her search for the truth, while her husband holds a lightning bolt. The third LEGO crew member is Galileo Galilei, who made several important discoveries about Jupiter, including the four largest satellites of Jupiter (named the Galilean moons in his honor). Of course, the miniature Galileo has his telescope with him on the journey.

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